Overview

The National ARCS (Achievement Rewards for College Scientists) Foundation, Inc., is a unique, nonprofit, national volunteer organization of women dedicated to providing scholarships to academically outstanding U.S. citizens studying to complete their degrees in science, medicine and engineering, thereby contributing to the worldwide advancement of science and technology.

ARCS Scholar Awards are intended to recognize and reward UC Irvine's most academically superior doctoral students exhibiting outstanding promise as scientists, researchers and public leaders.  Each recipient will receive a $7,500 stipend during the current academic year and, contingent upon continued satisfactory academic progress, will receive an additional $7,500 the following academic year. ARCS funding is in addition to existing support and may not be used as a substitute for other university support. 

Each school holds its own competition and selects which of its graduate students will receive ARCS Scholar Awards. UCI is required to abide by ARCS' criteria in making selections without regard to race, color, creed or gender and in the administration of allocated funds.

All donations are an investment in assuring America's continued progress and preeminence by providing for the education of capable, highly motivated, carefully screened young men and women who will be the skilled, dedicated scientists, technologists, researchers, doctors, engineers and professors to fill this need. Because dues from the members cover all operating costs and fund development work, 100 percent of all donations go directly to scholar awards each year.

Award Info

$7,500 stipend per year.

Eligibility

Each school holds its own competition and makes the final selection of its scholars who meet the following minimum criteria:

  • Must have achieved a graduate level UC GPA of 3.7 or better through Spring 2014 quarter.
  • Must have have completed at least two years of graduate study, with at least two years remaining before degree completion.
  • Must be making satisfactory progress toward their degree goal.
  • Must be a U.S. citizen.
  • Must have identified their individual area of research interest and be willing to prepare a poster board of their research for display at the awards dinner.
  • Must have exhibited excellent interpersonal and leadership abilities during their academic program.

Application Process

The scholar packets must be given to the school Dean's office and include the following:

  • A completed UCI ARCS Foundation Scholar Award Nomination
  • A completed Student Biographical Profile with a 100-word student bio
  • A current CV
  • A statement by the awardee of no more than 2-3 pages in length, describing their research project, progress to date, and plan for completion
  • A confidential evaluation of the student by their faculty advisor (multiple letters are acceptable)
  • Letters from the program advisor, department chair, and associate dean

The selection process will include a personal interview; each student must be able and willing to speak articulately about their career goals and research.

Contact Information:

Gina Anzivino
UCI-ARCS Program Coordinator
Graduate Division
120 Aldrich Hall, UC Irvine
Irvine CA, 92697-3180
(949) 824-8120
fax (949) 824-9096

Deadline

Each school holds its own competition and makes the final selection of its scholars.  2014-15 school selections are due to the Graduate Division by September 19, 2014.

About the ARCS Foundation

ARCS logoThe story of ARCS Foundation is the story of five decades of women -- energetic and steadfast in their devotion to the mission of the foundation -- who have contributed countless hours to the fulfillment of that mission.  It is the story of thousands of scholars who have received funding and devoted their college and work lives to the advancement of science in this country. 

ARCS Foundation was formed in 1958 in Los Angeles in response to Sputnik and the perceived lack of U.S. supremacy in the technology race.  Since then, ARCS Foundation has provided more than 14,754 scholars awards totaling nearly $87 million and has grown to 1,600 members in 17 Chapters across the United States.

ARCS Foundation, Inc. is a national organization dedicated to supporting the best and brightest U.S. graduate and undergraduate scholars by providing financial awards in science, engineering and medical research. 

ARCS 2012-2014 Scholars

 Jed Brubaker

Jed Brubaker

Degrees:

  • PhD, Information and Computer Sciences, UCI, 2015 expected
  • M.A., Communication, Culture and Technology, Georgetown University, 2009
  • B.S., Psychology, University of Utah, 2004

Research

Social computing and human computer interaction

Advisor: Dr. Gillian R. Hayes

Biography

Jed Brubaker is a PhD candidate in the department of Informatics where he researches the design of identity-related technologies and the experiences they enable. His dissertation focuses on our “digital afterlives” and how to improve the management of accounts and personal data after we die. Brubaker’s research has received a best paper award and numerous honorable mentions, and he was named UCI’s Most Promising Future Faculty Member for 2013. Brubaker earned his M.A. at Georgetown University in Communication, Culture and Technology, and previously graduated Summa Cum Laude with a B.S. in Psychology from the University of Utah.

Suzanne Klaus

Suzanne Klaus

Degrees:

  • M.D., School of Medicine, UCI, 2017 expected
  • Ph.D., Microbiology & Molecular Genetics, UCI, 2015 expected
  • B.S., Biochemistry, University of Iowa

Research

Role of Neutrophils in Salmonella Infection

Advisor:  Dr. Manuela Raffatellu

Biography

Suzi graduated from the University of Iowa with a B.S in Biochemistry and taught high school in American Samoa as an Americorps volunteer before joining UCI's Medical Scientist Training Program in 2009. Suzi's Ph.D. research focuses on neutrophil recruitment and function during Salmonella infection. Specifically, she is interested in characterizing intestinal neutrophil populations and understanding their role in expression of antimicrobial proteins during Salmonella infection. Suzi is interested in continuing her research in immunology and caring for patients with autoimmune or immunodeficient disorders. Suzi is also part of the leadership team of an ultrasound research study that screens high school and college athletes for hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Her non-scientific interests include biking, kayaking, playing tennis, and singing.

Maria Inez Falcon

Maria Inez Falcon

Degrees:

  • Ph.D., Neuroscience (in progress)
  • B.S., in biomedical engineering

Research

Physiological mechanisms subjacent to motor recovery after stroke

Advisor: Dr. Ana Solodkin

Biography

Inez completed her bachelors in biomedical engineering at Georgia Institute of Technology before entering the Neuroscience PhD program at UCI.  She has worked in research labs at Georgia Tech and Emory studying locomotion and peripheral nerve injury, and is currently performing her thesis work in the Brain Circuits Lab with a focus on motor recovery after stroke.  Inez plans to pursue a career in neurorehabilitation research.  She is also a teaching assistant for multiple courses, including head TA for the freshman biology course, having completed the HHMI training program.  In her spare time, she enjoys running and baking.

Cynthia Northrup

Cynthia Northrup

Degrees:

  • Ph.D., Mathematics, University of California, Irvine, expected 2014
  • M.S., Mathematics, University of California, Irvine, 2010.
  • B.A., Mathematics, California State University, Northridge, 2006.

Research

Mathematical Foundations and Set Theory

Advisor:  Dr. Martin Zeman

Biography

Cynthia obtained her bachelor’s in Mathematics from CSU Northridge while working with the diverse students of Los Angeles public schools in NSF’s GK-12 program.  Currently, she divides her time between research, teaching, and outreach.  Her research uses an iteration of Radin Forcing to force a model in which the Diamond property fails.  As the 2013-2014 Pedagogical Fellow for the mathematics department, she developed and ran the TA training for the math department’s incoming graduate students.  Outside academia, Cynthia trains in Olympic-style weightlifting and won the 2012 Strongest Anteater competition.

Peyton Paulick

Peyton Paulick

Degrees:

  • PhD, Biomedical Engineering, UCI 2014 (expected)
  • M.S., Biomedical Engineering, UCI 2011
  • B.S., Bioengineering with a minor in Spanish Studies UCSD, 2009

Research

Medical devices, hearing technology

Advisor: Dr. Mark Bachman

Biography

Peyton Paulick is beginning her fifth year of the doctoral program in Biomedical Engineering at UCI. She received her bachelors’ degrees in Bioengineering and Spanish at UCSD. Her research is focused on the development of medical devices and assistive healthcare monitoring technologies. Specifically, her PhD work is developing on a non-invasive auditory prosthesis. Peyton recently was awarded the Whitaker Foundation International Fellowship and the NIH Center for Hearing Research Training Grant. Peyton completed her Whitaker grant at Ludwig Maximilians Universität München in Germany developing an assistive device to measure the human pupil light reflex. In her spare time Peyton enjoys traveling, yoga, and photography.

Sarkis Babikian

Sarkis Babikian

Degrees:

  • PhD, Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, UCI, in progress
  • M.S., Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, UCI, 2011
  • B.S., Electrical Engineering, University of Damascus, 2008

Research

Integrated devices for Point-of-Care diagnostics and health monitoring.

Advisor: Dr. Mark Bachman

Biography

Sarkis is in his third year of the doctoral program in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at UCI. He received his B.S. degree in Electrical Engineering at University of Damascus and graduated with honors. In his PhD work Sarkis is developing integration technology to realize next generation Point-of-Care testing devices and wearable flexible health monitoring and drug delivery systems. His research is focused on developing methods to integrate microfluidics, optics and electronics for signal detection and micro actuation on flexible and stretchable substrates.  In his spare time he enjoys road biking and traveling.

Samuel Hallman

Samuel Hallman

Degrees:

  • PhD, Computer Science, UCI, 2015 expected
  • B.S., Computer Science, UCI, 2009

Research

Computer vision.

Advisor:  Charless Fowlkes

Biography

Sam received a B.S. degree in computer science from the University of California, Irvine in 2009. He returned as a PhD student in 2010 and has since been studying computer vision under Professor Charless Fowlkes, with whom he had originally worked as an undergraduate beginning in the summer of 2008. His main interests are in image segmentation and object recognition, with a focus on applications to biological image analysis.

Matthew Dawson

Matthew Dawson

Degrees:

  • Atmospheric Chemistry, UCI, Ph.D., 2014 expected
  • Chemistry, University of Pittsburgh, B.S., 2009
  • Chemistry, Community College of Allegheny County, 2006

Research

New particle formation from methanesulfonic acid, amines and water in the atmosphere.

Advisor:  B.J. Finlayson-Pitts

Biography

Matthew is a doctoral student in the School of Physical Sciences and holds a B.S. in Chemistry from the University of Pittsburgh.  In his current laboratory experiments, he is looking to understand the fundamental chemistry of how aerosol particles form and grow in the atmosphere. The mechanisms involved in new particle formation currently are not well understood and his research is aimed at being able to accurately predict particle formation and growth from gas-phase precursors. This is crucial in the efforts to model their effects on human health, visibility and climate change. He believes that atmospheric aerosol chemistry is an exciting field with many open questions and can be approached from a variety of perspectives including theoretical modeling, field measurements and laboratory experiments.  Matthew's long-term goal is to continue to conduct research in this field and to broaden his research background to include some of these other approaches.

Virginia Liu

Virginia Liu

Degrees:

  • MD/PhD, Medicine/Anatomy & Neurobiology, UCI, PhD Summer 2013
  • B.S., Biochemistry, UCLA, 2006

Research

Dense-array electroencephalography (dEEG) application to acute stroke. 

Advisor:  Steven Cramer

Biography

After graduating from the UCLA College Honors Program in 2006 with a B.S. in Biochemistry, Virginia conducted translational research in the Heart Lung and Blood Institute as an NIH Intramural Research Training Award fellow.  In 2008, she joined the UCI Medical Scientist Training Program and currently investigates dense-array electroencephalography (dEEG) application to acute stroke.  She hopes the synergy of clinical training with neuroimaging research will allow her contribute to therapy development and early intervention in neurological diseases. Her clinical career interest is in neurointerventional radiology and her hope is to further healthcare options with human-based neuroscience research. Virginia's  passion is integrating arts in medicine to improve quality of hospital stay, physician-patient communication, and emotional health of patients and staff.  To achieve this goal, she is the founder and director of the MEDleys A Cappella and Chamber Ensemble, and was Co-Editor in Chief of the PLEXUS journal.  Additionally, she serves as VP of Hospital Programming for the Music to Healnon-profit.  In her free time, Virginia enjoys dancing and volunteering at a student-run clinic in rural Mexico with the Flying Samaritans

Andrew Newman

Andrew Newman

Degrees:

  • PhD, Biological Science, UCI, Fall 2013
  • B.S., Genetics, University of Wisconsin, 2006

Research

The process of angiogenesis in tumors.

Advisor:  Christopher Hughes

Biography

With a B.S. in Genetics from the University of Wisconsin, Andrew has focused his efforts on studying the process of angiogenesis in tumors. He is interested in studying the intercellular signaling pathways between cancerous and non-cancerous cells within the tumor microenvironment that regulate new blood vessel growth and tumor development. As part of this work he and his colleagues have identified a number of extracellular matrix proteins critical to new blood vessel formation and are now focusing on the role of Wnt5a in blood vessel maturation. Upon completion of his PhD work, Andrew would like to continue with research in the field of cancer biology and hopes to aid in the development of complex in vitro systems that will improve cancer drug screening. When not conducting research, he can be found playing flag football, basketball and softball. An avid sports fan of all Chicago sports teams, Andrew enjoys outdoor activities including hiking, biking and relaxing at the beach. 

Melinda Simon

Melinda Simon

Degrees:

  • PhD, Biomedical Engineering, UCI, 2014 expected
  • PhD, Biomedical Engineering, UCI, 2014 expected
  • B.S., Chemical Engineering, University of Cincinnati, 2007

Research

Stem cell research.  

Advisor:  Abraham Lee

Biography

Melinda is a PhD candidate in Biomedical Engineering at UCI with an interest in developing microfabricated devices to further the capabilities of stem cell research.  More specifically, she is working to develop a device to analyze genetic information from individual neural stem cells for a large number of cells. This information will be used to identify genes important to the differentiation of these cells, and may allow for the development of sorting strategies to obtain more homogeneous populations of neural stem cells with a certain fate potential.  In her spare time, she enjoys traveling and trying new recipes. 

Annie Vogel-Cierna

Annie Vogel-Cierna

Degrees:

  • PhD, Biological Sciences, UCI, 2014 expected
  • B.S., Biotechnology and Psychology, North Dakota State University, 2008

Research

Neuron-specific nucleosome remodeling complex in regulating transcription subserving long-term memory formation. 

Advisor:  Marcelo Wood

Biography

Annie is pursuing her PhD in Dr. Marcelo Wood's laboratory, where her thesis project focuses on the role of a neuron-specific nucleosome remodeling complex in regulating transcription subserving long-term memory formation. Her interest in studying learning and memory began when her grandmother developed Alzheimer's disease. She understands how critically important long-term memory is for both our daily function and defining ourselves as individuals. She completed her undergraduate degree with double majors in Biotechnology and Psychology from North Dakota State University. Annie's long-term goal is to one day run her own laboratory as a principle investigator. In addition to her dedication to scientific training she is also passionate about long distance running.  Since entering graduate school she has completed four marathons and three ultra marathons (50k).  She has used the training for these events as both a form of stress relief and meditation. Currently, Annie is training to run the Tucson Marathon in December with the intent of qualifying for the Boston Marathon in April, 2013.

Mona Wood

Mona Wood

Degrees:

  • M.D., School of Medicine, UCI, 2016 expected
  • PhD, Chemistry, UCI, 2014 expected
  • PhD, Chemistry, UCI, 2014 expected

Research

Application of computational biophysics methods towards the development of clinical treatments.

Advisor:  Douglas Tobias

Biography

Mona completed a B.S. Chem degree from the University of Michigan, where she majored in chemistry, biochemistry and French and wrote honors theses in chemistry and biochemistry. Mona joined the MD/PhD program in 2008 and is pursuing her PhD in chemistry with Professor Douglas Tobias.  Her current research uses computational biophysics and cell biology methods to study an ion channel that is involved in the immune system and cancer.  Insights gained about channel structure are applied towards development of drugs that modulate channel behavior. These drugs have the potential to be useful in treating allergies or cancer. Her long-term goal is to continue in this general line of investigation as a physician scientist involved in patient care and research.  Mona has published two peer-reviewed articles, presented at the National MD/PhD Conference and received a summer fellowship from Lawrence Livermore National Lab. She cofounded the translational medicine journal club and co-chairs the MSTP Distinguished Lecture Series. She enjoys traveling and has studied in France and volunteered in India.

ARCS 2011-2013 Scholars

Previous ARCS Recipients

ARCS Scholars