Overview

Public Impact Fellowships highlight and support doctoral students whose current research has the potential for substantial impact in the public sphere. Ideal candidates will be involved in research designed to significantly improve or enrich the lives of Californians and/or national and global communities.

All schools are eligible to nominate students to compete for a total of 14 fellowships. Four Public Impact Distinguished Fellows will each receive $10,000. Ten Public Impact Fellows will each receive $1,000. Public Impact Distinguished Fellows may choose to accept their awards during winter or spring quarter, or over both quarters, at their discretion. Public Impact Fellows will receive their awards in winter quarter. Public Impact Fellowships are intended to supplement, not replace, any funding that students may already be receiving.

Nominations must be submitted to the Graduate Division by 12:00 p.m. (noon) on Friday, October 23, 2015.

Please use the following forms in preparing nominations:

Award Info

Graduate Division Public Impact Distinguished Fellowships: $10,000 to be used as a stipend

Graduate Division Public Impact Fellowships: $1,000 to be used as a stipend

Eligibility

For UC Irvine Public Impact Fellowships, nominees must, at minimum, meet the following criteria:

  1. Maintain UCI GPA of 3.7 or higher through the previous spring quarter.
  2. Be a current, full-time doctoral student who has advanced to candidacy.
  3. Conduct research that has critical public impact. (Examples of relevant research include studies that aim to improve economic opportunity and well-being, health care, social justice, political participation, cultural engagement, and scientific or technical solutions to pressing social issues.)
  4. Be willing to have research spotlighted/featured on both the Graduate Division’s and UCI’s website, brochures and social networks, and be able and available to effectively communicate and discuss their research in lay terms with prospective donors, legislators and/or their staff, and the media during winter and spring quarters.
  5. If selected as a finalist, students must be available to give a brief presentation to the selection committee, with no visual aids, immediately followed by a brief interview. Interviews are tentatively scheduled for Tuesday, November 17, 2015.

Please note that DACA/AB540/130/131 eligible students may be nominated for Public Impact Fellowships.

Application Process

Schools are asked to collect nominations from each department and then forward the most promising nominees, based on merit and the potential public impact of the student's research. There is no limit to the number of nominations each school may submit. The final selection committee will consider several factors when choosing the awardees, including the student's presentation, interview, their ability to convey their research to a broad audience, academic record, letters of recommendation, degree progress, and research impact.

Nominations must be submitted to the Graduate Division by 12:00 p.m. (noon) on Friday, October 23, 2015. Late or incomplete nomination packets will not be reviewed. Please note that Schools and Departments typically have earlier internal deadlines for fellowship submissions. Please contact your School or Department for details.

  • Students must provide the following documents to their department:
    • A complete Student Information Form (please provide both a .doc version and a signed copy). Please save your Student Information Form in Microsoft Word in the following format: "IMPACT APP - SID#.doc", e.g. "IMPACT APP - 12345678.doc"
    • A current curriculum vitae
    • A letter of recommendation from the student's faculty advisor
  • Departments must complete the Nomination Form. Please save nomination forms in Microsoft Word in the following format: "IMPACT NOM - SID#.doc", e.g. "IMPACT NOM - 12345678.doc"
  • Departments should print the nomination form and assist students in obtaining original signatures
  • Once forms are final with signatures, please scan documents to a single PDF file for each nominee in this order:
    1. Nomination Form (signed by the Faculty Advisor and Associate Dean)
    2. Student Information Form (signed by the student)
    3. Curriculum vitae
    4. Faculty advisor letter of recommendation
  • Please save the new PDF file as "IMPACT - SID#.pdf", e.g. "IMPACT - 12345678.pdf"
  • When all documentation is complete, e-mail the following items separately for each student to Kate Triglia:
    • The original Microsoft Word (.doc) Nomination Form
    • The original Microsoft Word (.doc) Student Information Form
    • The PDF file to include all items listed above

Contact Information

Questions should be directed to Kate Triglia at (949) 824-9031.

Deadline

Nominations must be submitted to the Graduate Division by 12:00 p.m. (noon) on Friday, October 23, 2015. Schools must submit applications via email to Kate Triglia.

Notes

  • Students receiving any Public Impact Fellowship may be employed as TAs and/or GSRs.  Students who receive $1,000 honorable mention awards may hold any type of appointments. 
  • For students already receiving financial aid, acceptance of a Public Impact Fellowship may affect his or her overall financial need-based support package.  In such cases, students are encouraged to consult with the UCI Office of Financial Aid and Scholarships. 
  • Students should review the terms of any funding that they have accepted for AY 2015-2016 to ensure that they are eligible to receive additional fellowship funding.
  • Previous winners (full awardees and honorable mentions) and current ARCS scholars are not eligible for this year’s competition.

Current Fellows

Nameer Rahman Baker

Nameer Rahman Baker

Public Impact Distinguished Fellow

Degrees:

  • Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, PhD, 2016 expected
  • Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Kansas, BS, 2011
  • Anthropology, University of Kansas, BA, 2011

Research

Responses of microbial communities to climate change in Southern California

Biography

Nameer Baker is a doctoral candidate in Dr. Steven Allison’s laboratory in the Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology at UCI. After pursuing a B.S. in Ecology and a B.A. in Anthropology from the University of Kansas, he came out west to study microbes under the tutelage of UCI’s vibrant microbial ecology group. His research aims to determine how microbial communities critical to ecosystem function will be affected by Southern California’s future shift to a more arid climate. His research has been supported by the UC Natural Reserves system through a Mildred E. Mathias grant, as well as with a fellowship from the University of California’s Institute for the Study of Ecological Effects of Climate Impacts. He has presented his research at the annual meetings of the Ecological Society of America and the American Geophysical Union, and has also been recognized for his teaching ability as a Francisco J. Ayala School of Biological Sciences Teaching Fellow.

What this Fellowship/Award Means:

Being awarded the Public Impact Fellowship is a humbling honor. I have always been motivated by the great power that scientific research has to help us confront the issues we must face as a society, and as such it is invigorating to find that others also find my research to be of value. Receiving this award motivates me to more widely share not only my research, but the pride I have in the work that is being done by my lab, department, and university.

Julius A. Edson

Julius A. Edson

Public Impact Distinguished Fellow

Degrees:

  • Chemical Engineering & Biochemical Engineering, UC Irvine, PhD, 2017 expected
  • Chemical Engineering & Biochemical Engineering, UC Irvine, MS, 2014
  • Chemical Engineering, City College of New York, BSe, 2012

Research

Engineering new material based antimicrobial to treat drug resistant infections

Biography

Julius Edson received his B.S.E in Chemical Engineering with a concentration in Nanotechnology and Bioengineering from the City College of New York. He is currently a NSF GRFP fellow pursuing his Ph.D. in Chemical and Biochemical Engineering in the lab of Dr. Young Jik Kwon. His research focuses on the development of nanoantibiotics capable of reversing drug resistance in bacteria, such as drug resistant M. tuberculosis. In conjunction with research, Julius also holds leadership positions as co-chair of the Engineering/ICS DECADE student council and vice president of the chemical engineering and materials science graduate student association.

What this Fellowship/Award Means:

Receiving the Public Impact Fellowship is a wonderful honor. Not only does it allow me the opportunity to share my research with a diverse audience, but hopefully it will also galvanize otherwise to pursue research in developing novel antimicrobials that we so desperately need.

Matthew R. Lane

Matthew R. Lane

Public Impact Distinguished Fellow

Degrees:

  • Anthropology, MA/PhD, UC Irvine, 2016 expected
  • MAPSS Anthropology Cohort, MA, The University of Chicago, 2008
  • English Education, MEd, The University of Florida, 2001
  • Anthropology, BA, The University of Florida (Summa Cum Laude), 1999
  • English, BA, The University of Florida (Magna Cum Laude) 1999

Research

Understanding the movements, mechanics, value and labor in the global trade of scrap metal recyclables.

Biography

A Doctoral Candidate in Anthropology at the University of California, Irvine, Matt earned an M.A. in the Anthropology Cohort of the MAPSS Program at the University of Chicago after completing an early career in teaching literature, creative writing, and anthropology in public and private schools. Matt's current research examines the global trade of scrap metal recyclables where they are collected in the alleyways of Chicago, shipped through the Port of Los Angeles, financed in Mumbai and smelted in Bangalore, India. His research has focused on the collection, movement, exchange, transport and fashioning of end of life materials into new commodities in mini-steel mills. By seeing recycling as a series of cycles within cycles, Matt examines the transnational trade of scrap metal recyclables as a green enterprise that relies on a series of brokering agents in diverse places. Matt has conducted internships at Stree Mukhti Sanghatana in Mumbai and in the Business and Trade Development Office at the Port of Los Angeles. His research has been supported by The National Science Foundation, The American Institute of Indian Studies, UC Berkeley’s Human Rights Center, UCLA’s Labor Center, UC Irvine’s Center for Asian Studies, and UC Irvine’s Anthropology Department.

What this Fellowship/Award Means:

This fellowship is a tremendous honor. I hope that my research on recycling will illuminate the successes of all the men, women and children in the United States and India who intentionally and unintentionally reduce landfill capacity, carbon emissions, and the need for virgin ore resources through their labor collecting, sorting, shipping, and smelting end-of-life metal recyclables into new commodities. I further hope that the century-old scrap metal economy in the United States can serve as a model for further social entrepreneurial development for the expansion of recycling beyond the standard fare of papers, plastics, and metals.

Elena Liang

Elena Liang

Public Impact Distinguished Fellow

Degrees:

  • Biomedical Engineering, UC Irvine, PhD, 2016 expected
  • Biomedical Engineering, UC Irvine, MS, 2014
  • Bioengineering, UC Berkeley, BS, 2009

Research

Selective cell adhesion by nanotopography for application in an artificial cornea

Biography

Elena Liang is a doctoral candidate in Biomedical Engineering. She works in Dr. Albert Yee’s laboratory in Chemical Engineering and Materials Science. In her research, Elena seeks to control cell adhesion on polymer surfaces using different nanopatterns. She aims to translate her work towards medical implants. Her current focus is on artificial cornea made entirely of one material in order to restore vision to patients that cannot accept corneal transplantation. She believes that this nanotechnology will have broad application to biomedical devices. As a teaching assistant for the BME-MSE joint senior design course, Elena mentored at least 30 student teams over two years. She also served in Rocket Science Tutors to encourage students in the Santa Ana school district to pursue science and engineering careers.

What this Fellowship/Award Means:

Receiving this award is a tremendous honor and invaluable for achieving my research and career goals. I am encouraged that my work is recognized for the potential of fundamentally changing how cell adhesion is controlled in medical implants, improving not only artificial corneas. I am determined to develop a testing prototype during the rest of my time at UC Irvine.

Bonnie Bui

Bonnie Bui

Public Impact Fellow

Degrees:

  • Sociology, UC Irvine, PhD, 2017 expected
  • Demographic and Social Analysis, UC Irvine, MA, 2014
  • Sociology, CSU Fullerton, MA, 2010
  • Economics, CSU Fullerton, BA, 2004

Research

Examination of the reciprocal effects of social network characteristics and physical and mental health, with an emphasis on the health consequences associated with social isolation and lack of social support among an older adult population

Biography

Bonnie Bui is a PhD candidate in sociology, having earned an MA in Demographic and Social Analysis at UC Irvine and an MA in sociology at CSU Fullerton.  Before beginning her graduate work at UCI, she worked as a researcher at the Orange County Health Needs Assessment (OCHNA), a public health research organization that produced reports highlighting health needs with the aim of informing local policy makers and hospital administrators.  Her time at OCHNA deepened her interest in health, resulting in a co-authored publication using OCHNA data.  Her dissertation research investigates how social support networks and physical and mental health are inextricably linked.  Bonnie’s interest in health disparities continues to drive her research agenda, where she focuses specifically on the social context of health in an aging population.

What this Fellowship/Award Means:

I am deeply honored to receive an award that recognizes the public impact of academic research.  Being a Public Impact Fellow will serve as a reminder for me to continue research that aims to highlight unmet health needs.  More importantly, this award signals that social science research on health that situates individuals in a broader social context is becoming increasingly important in light of an aging population and dwindling social net resources that will necessitate the promotion of alternatives to health care other than that provided by current medical institutions.

Lindsay Ann Cameron

Lindsay Ann Cameron

Public Impact Fellow

Degrees:

  • Inorganic Chemistry, UC Irvine, PhD, 2017 expected
  • Fine Art: Photography, University of Louisville, BFA, 2006

Research

The design and synthesis of molecular photosensitizers for use in artificial photosynthetic and photovoltaic energy conversion platforms.

Biography

Lindsay is a fourth year graduate student in the Alan F. Heyduk research group at the University of California, Irvine. Born and raised in Louisville, Kentucky, Lindsay received a Bachelor of Fine Arts degree, in photography, from the University of Louisville in 2006. In 2012 she joined the Heyduk group at UCI.  Lindsay’s research in the Heyduk lab focuses on solving a key challenge in solar energy conversion: the design of systems that both efficiently and inexpensively harvest photons and convert it to useable energy. Her investigation into the fundamental scientific principles of solar energy conversion is centered on the design and synthesis of photosensitizers based on earth abundant transition metal ions that possess strongly reducing excited states accompanied by enhanced spectral response in the low energy region of the electromagnetic spectrum.

What this Fellowship/Award Means:

I am both thrilled and honored to receive the Public Impact Fellowship. As a fellow I will be committed in solving important societal problems, the greatest of which is the delivery of a carbon-neutral and sustainable energy supply for the 21st century. The Public Impact Fellowship award will support and encourage me to educate scientists, students, and the general public about artificial photosynthesis and how harnessing our most abundant energy resource, the Sun is imperative in meeting global energy demands.

Santina Contreras

Santina Contreras

Public Impact Fellow

Degrees:

  • Planning, Policy and Design, UC Irvine, Ph.D., 2016 expected
  • Structural Engineering, UC Berkeley, M.S., 2008
  • Structural Engineering, UC San Diego, B.S., 2007

Research

Organizations and Participatory Development: Post-disaster Recovery in Haiti

Biography

Santina Contreras is a doctoral candidate in the department of Planning, Policy and Design at UC Irvine. After earning a B.S (UC San Diego) and M.S. (UC Berkeley) in structural engineering, she worked in the private and nonprofit sectors on the design and implementation of housing and public service projects within diverse and vulnerable communities (including areas in Indonesia and Haiti). Her current work builds on her academic and professional experiences by investigating the relationships between organizations and community members in areas of severe poverty, especially under environmental stress such as earthquakes, flooding, and other hazards. Specifically, her dissertation research examines the use of different participatory models used by organizations working in Haiti, following the devastating 2010 earthquake.

What this Fellowship/Award Means:

I am very grateful and honored to receive the Public Impact Fellowship. This award not only provides support to my academic and professional pursuits, but is also an acknowledgment of the importance and need for research focused on improving the physical and social resiliency of communities vulnerable to natural disasters.

Mary Nora Dickson

Mary Nora Dickson

Public Impact Fellow

Degrees:

  • Chemical Engineering, UC Irvine, PhD, 2016 expected
  • Chemical Engineering, Columbia University, MS, 2011
  • Chemical Engineering, Columbia University, BS, 2010

Research

Antibacterial Polymer Coatings for Medical Devices

Biography

Mary Nora Dickson is harnessing nanotechnology to make plastics antibacterial by incorporating nano-spikes at the surface. Such surfaces could decrease dependence on antibiotics for control of infection on implanted medical devices, which is of increasing importance as MRSA and other multi-drug resistant bacteria are beginning to spread. This project fuses her undergraduate polymers research and her Masters research on micro-scale blood cell separation devices. Because of her interest in nano-scale imaging, she is also working as a lab assistant at the Irvine Materials Research Institute. Mary is a dedicated teacher and mentor, and was awarded departmental TA of the year for 2013-2014. Committed to scientific communication, she is also a regular contributor to Materials Research Bulletin.

What this Fellowship/Award Means:

Mary is extremely honored to receive the Public Impact Fellowship, which will support her in pursuing her research interests and in communicating scientific findings through teaching and writing.  She is excited to share with the public the importance of engineering research. 

Julie Gerlinger

Julie Gerlinger

Public Impact Fellow

Degrees:

  • Criminology, Law & Society, UC Irvine, PhD, 2017 expected
  • Criminology, Law & Society, UC Irvine, MA, 2013
  • Sociology, UC Los Angeles, BA, 2008

Research

Contextualizing the adoption, implementation, and disproportionate effects of zero tolerance in public schools

Biography

Julie Gerlinger is a doctoral candidate in the Department of Criminology, Law and Society. While living in Los Angeles, she conducted ethnographic research at a continuation school, worked with various nonprofits at a consulting firm, and completed over 150 hours of training to volunteer as a Reserve Deputy Probation Officer for LA County. Her primary research interests include school discipline policies, social mobility and inequality, and the criminalization of juvenile behaviors. Ms. Gerlinger has worked as a research assistant on several projects at UCI, including the Irvine Network on Interventions in Development in the School of Education, a project on gang/racial violence in California’s Division of Juvenile Justice, and a study on the projected outcomes of California’s Public Safety Realignment in UCI’s Center for Evidence-Based Corrections. She is also working on a schools and neighborhood crime study with her advisor, John R. Hipp, in the Irvine Laboratory for the Study of Space and Crime, which earned her the Data Science Initiative summer fellowship in 2015. Ms. Gerlinger is currently working on her dissertation, which draws on multiple sources of data to addresses how zero tolerance policies foster social reproduction and inequality.

What this Fellowship/Award Means:

This fellowship is an honor to receive, in large part because it recognizes my work as meaningful beyond academia. My inspiration for this dissertation is to leverage social science research to help do what we’re all committed to doing: ensuring our children—all of our children—get the best public education possible. The Public Impact Fellowship supports students who are motivated and capable of making worthwhile changes to the community, and for this I am greatly humbled.

Christian Fernando Guerrero-Juarez

Christian Fernando Guerrero-Juarez

Public Impact Fellow

Degrees:

  • Biological Sciences, UC Irvine, PhD, 2017, expected
  • Developmental and Cell Biology, UC Irvine, MS, 2016, expected
  • Biochemistry, CSU San Bernardino, BA, 2012
  • Biology, CSU San Bernardino, BS, 2012

Research

Mechanisms of enhanced cutaneous tissue regeneration in response to injury

Biography

Christian Fernando Guerrero-Juarez is a Doctoral Candidate in Dr. Maksim V. Plikus’ laboratory in the Department of Developmental and Cell Biology at UC Irvine. His research interests are focused on stem cell biology and regeneration of complex tissues and organs under homeostatic conditions and in response to injury or disease. His dissertation investigates the molecular mechanisms underlining cell reprogramming in regenerating cutaneous tissues. As a graduate student, Christian has received an NIH IMSD-MBRS training grant and was awarded the prestigious NSF Graduate Research Fellowship in 2013. He is also the recipient of the 2015 Susan V. Bryant Graduate Fellowship Award for his groundbreaking research in the field of regeneration. Christian has been part of important research collaborations with prominent investigators that have led to publications in top-tier scientific journals including Cell and Science.

What this Fellowship/Award Means:

I am truly honored to have been recognized as a Public Impact Fellow. This award will help support my efforts toward understanding the mechanisms underlining regeneration of tissues and organs in adults.

Rupa Jose

Rupa Jose

Public Impact Fellow

Degrees:

  • Psychology and Social Behavior, UC Irvine, PhD, 2017 expected
  • Psychology (major) and Anthropology (minor), University of Notre Dame, B.A., 2009

Research

Community organizations and individual mental health in the wake of the 2013 Boston Marathon bombings (dissertation)

Biography

Rupa Jose is a doctoral candidate in the Department of Psychology and Social Behavior. Before coming to the University of California, Irvine, Rupa was an assistant language teacher of English to hearing impaired and low-income youth in Toyama, Japan and graduated cum laude from the University of Notre Dame.  Her work focuses on issues of mental health, crime, and delinquency. Specifically, she has studied the social supports and resiliency of domestic violence victims, community mental illness as a predictor of crime rates, the social networks of delinquent adolescents, and factors that facilitate post-disaster mental health.

What this Fellowship/Award Means:

I am honored to have been selected to receive the UCI Public Impact Fellowship. I am strongly committed to conducting research that has the potential to improve the lives of individuals in our broader community. Receipt of this fellowship will enable me to continue my interdisciplinary research on how neighborhoods and social networks impact individual mental health to improve public policy and welfare in California and across the U.S. more generally.

Suman Kumar Mitra

Suman Kumar Mitra

Public Impact Fellow

Degrees:

  • Transportation Science, UC Irvine, Ph.D., 2016 expected
  • Urban and Regional Planning, Bangladesh University of Engineering & Technology, M.U.R.P, 2008
  • Urban and Regional Planning, Bangladesh University of Engineering & Technology, B.U.R.P, 2005

Research

Travel Behavior Analysis on Social Justice Issues in Urban Transportation Planning

Biography

Suman Kumar Mitra is a PhD candidate in Transportation Science at the University of California, Irvine. He earned his Bachelor and Master’s degree in Urban and Regional Planning from Bangladesh University of Engineering and Technology. He is currently working on his PhD dissertation research under the guidance of Professor Jean-Daniel Saphores.  His dissertation research has three parts: Part 1 explores how transportation facilities influence property value in developing countries with an application to Rajshahi, Bangladesh; Part 2 analyzes the travel behavior of voluntary and involuntary carless households in California, both for social justice and environmental reasons; and Part 3 it explores characteristics of long distance travel in California. His research interests are unified by a desire to find viable ways to reduce our dependence on automobile travel.  He is the recipient of a 2015-2016 Chancellor Club Fund for Excellence Fellowship from the University of California, Irvine and of a 2014 Phi Beta Kappa International Scholarship also from the University of California, Irvine.

 

What this Fellowship/Award Means:

I have always been concerned with making my work useful for the more disadvantaged people in society so receiving this prestigious public impact fellowship is a recognition of my efforts to improve transportation for disadvantaged people. It will encourage me to continue my research on social justice issues in urban transportation planning and help me to pursue my career goals. I am honored and very grateful to have received this fellowship.

Carol Q. Pham

Carol Q. Pham

Public Impact Fellow

Degrees:

  • Biomedical Sciences, UC Irvine, PhD, 2016 expected
  • Neurobiology, UC Berkeley, BA, 2010

Research

Treatments of Central Auditory Processing Disorders

Biography

Carol Pham is a PhD candidate in the Center for Hearing Research and Department of Anatomy & Neurobiology. Her interest in auditory neuroscience naturally emerged as a violinist doing auditory research at UC Berkeley where she studied neurobiology and completed a music minor. Carol’s doctoral studies focus on how the ear and brain processes sounds to segregate speech amidst background noise. Her research aims to improve auditory prostheses and evaluate drug therapies for increasing speech-in-noise perception in people with profound deafness and auditory processing disorders. She has given scientific presentations at the Conference for Implantable Auditory Prostheses and the Association for Research in Otolaryngology and received NSF honor and NIH-funded fellowships. Her K-12 outreach helps promote STEM learning and raise awareness for hearing impairments.

What this Fellowship/Award Means:

The Public Impact Fellowship recognizes the importance of auditory research at UCI which could benefit millions of hearing impaired people worldwide. This award will facilitate completing my dissertation research and empower my efforts to engage the public in hearing science and health.

Johannes Rebelein

Johannes Rebelein

Public Impact Fellow

Degrees:

  • Molecular Biology & Biochemistry, UC Irvine, PhD, 2016 (expected)
  • Biotechnology, TU Braunschweig, Germany, MS, 2012
  • Biotechnology, TU Braunschweig, Germany, BS, 2010

Research

Biofuel Formation by Nitrogenase – Recycling the Industrial Exhaust CO and the Greenhouse Gas CO2 into Biofuels

Biography

Johannes Rebelein is a doctoral candidate in the Department of Molecular Biology & Biochemistry. He earned a B.S. and an M.S. degree in Biotechnology from TU Braunschweig, Germany. The studies in Braunschweig sparked his interests in the fundamental biological process of photosynthesis, and he completed his M.S. thesis with a project investigating the connection between photosynthesis and nitrogen fixation. In 2012, Johannes joined the Ribbe group at UCI to pursue a Ph.D. degree in Biochemistry and, since the beginning of his Ph.D. studies, he has been exploring the catalytic potential of the nitrogen-fixing enzyme nitrogenase in the conversion of the toxic exhaust CO and the greenhouse gas CO2 into combustible fuels. His findings have provided a useful template for the development of strategies to recycle CO and CO2 into hydrocarbons, the major constituents of carbon fuels. He has published two first-author papers in high-profile journals, filed two US patents and presented his research to large international audiences at major research conferences in the field of biological chemistry, receiving recognition with a poster award from the American Chemical Society at the Enzymes Coenzymes and Metabolic Pathways - Gordon Research Conference. 

What this Fellowship/Award Means:

I am tremendously honored to receive the 2015 Public Impact Fellowship, which recognizes the importance of my work to our society. This award is incredibly motivating for me and encourages me to further explore fundamental questions of biology and chemistry. It will constantly remind me that basic science often leads to unexpected applications, as shown by the research I have been conducting, in which we exploit the unique catalytic capabilities of nitrogenase to convert CO and CO2 into biofuels.

View Fellows Archive

Public Impact Fellows