Overview

Public Impact Fellowships highlight and support doctoral students whose current research has the potential for substantial impact in the public sphere. Ideal candidates will be involved in research designed to significantly improve or enrich the lives of Californians and/or national and global communities.

All schools are eligible to nominate students to compete for a total of 14 fellowships. Four Public Impact Distinguished Fellows will each receive $12,000. Ten Public Impact Fellows will each receive $1,000. Public Impact Distinguished Fellows may choose to accept their awards during winter or spring quarter, or over both quarters, at their discretion. Public Impact Fellows will receive their awards in winter quarter. Public Impact Fellowships are intended to supplement, not replace, any funding that students may already be receiving.

Nominations must be submitted to the Graduate Division by 5pm on Friday, October 21, 2016.

Please use the following forms in preparing nominations:

Award Info

Graduate Division Public Impact Distinguished Fellowships: $12,000 to be used as a stipend

Graduate Division Public Impact Fellowships: $1,000 to be used as a stipend

Students who receive full $12,000 awards may not be appointed as ASEs during the award period, but may be appointed as GSRs. Students who receive $1,000 honorable mention awards may be appointed as ASEs or GSRs.

Eligibility

For UC Irvine Public Impact Fellowships, nominees must, at minimum, meet the following criteria:

  1. Maintain UCI GPA of 3.7 or higher through the previous spring quarter.
  2. Be a current, full-time doctoral student who has advanced to candidacy.
  3. Conduct research that has critical public impact. (Examples of relevant research include studies that aim to improve economic opportunity and well-being, health care, social justice, political participation, cultural engagement, and scientific or technical solutions to pressing social issues.)
  4. Be willing to have research spotlighted/featured on both the Graduate Division’s and UCI’s website, brochures and social networks, and be able and available to effectively communicate and discuss their research in lay terms with prospective donors, legislators and/or their staff, and the media during winter and spring quarters.
  5. If selected as a finalist, students must be available to give a brief presentation to the selection committee, with no visual aids, immediately followed by a brief interview. Interviews will be held in mid-to-late November.

Please note that AB540 eligible students may be nominated for Public Impact Fellowships.

Application Process

Schools are asked to collect nominations from each department and then forward the most promising nominees, based on merit and the potential public impact of the student's research. There is no limit to the number of nominations each school may submit. The final selection committee will consider several factors when choosing the awardees, including the student's presentation, interview, their ability to convey their research to a broad audience, academic record, letters of recommendation, degree progress, and research impact.

Nominations must be submitted to Kate Triglia in the Graduate Division by 5pm on Friday, October 21, 2016. Late or incomplete nomination packets will not be reviewed. Please note that Schools and Departments typically have earlier internal deadlines for fellowship submissions. Please contact your School or Department for details.

  • Students must provide the following documents to their department:
    1. A complete Student Information Form (please provide both a .doc version and a signed copy). Please save your Student Information Form in Microsoft Word in the following format: "IMPACT APP - SID#.doc", e.g. "IMPACT APP - 12345678.doc"
    2. A current curriculum vitae
    3. A letter of recommendation from the student's faculty advisor
  • Departments must complete the Nomination Form. Please save nomination forms in Microsoft Word in the following format: "IMPACT NOM - SID#.doc", e.g. "IMPACT NOM - 12345678.doc"
  • Departments should print the nomination form and assist students in obtaining original signatures
  • Once forms are final with signatures, please scan documents to a single PDF file for each nominee in this order:
    1. Nomination Form (signed by the Faculty Advisor and Associate Dean)
    2. Student Information Form (signed by the student)
    3. Curriculum vitae
    4. Faculty advisor letter of recommendation
  • Please save the new PDF file as "IMPACT - SID#.pdf", e.g. "IMPACT - 12345678.pdf"
  • When all documentation is complete, e-mail the following items for each student to Kate Triglia:
    1. The original Microsoft Word (.doc) Nomination Form
    2. The original Microsoft Word (.doc) Student Information Form
    3. The PDF file to include all items listed above

Contact Information

Questions should be directed to Kate Triglia at (949) 824-9031.

Deadline

Deadlines for the 2017-2018 Public Impact Fellowship competition will be announced in September 2017.

Students should consult with their program's graduate affairs staff member, as many Schools and programs set earlier internal deadlines.

Notes

  • Students who receive full $12,000 awards may not be appointed as ASEs during the award period, but may be appointed as GSRs. Students who receive $1,000 honorable mention awards may be appointed as ASEs or GSRs.
  • For students already receiving financial aid, acceptance of a Public Impact Fellowship may affect his or her overall financial need-based support package. In such cases, students are encouraged to consult with the UCI Office of Financial Aid and Scholarships. 
  • Previous winners (full awardees and honorable mentions) are not eligible for this year’s competition.

Current Fellows

Veronica Ahumada Newhart

Veronica Ahumada Newhart

Public Impact Distinguished Fellow

Degrees:

  • Education: Language, Literacy & Technology, UC Irvine, PhD, 2017 expected
  • Education, UC Irvine, MA, 2016
  • Adult Education, University of Georgia, M.Ed., 2004
  • English, Loma Linda University, BA, 1993

Research

Virtual inclusion via interactive technologies.

Biography

Veronica Ahumada Newhart is a doctoral candidate in Dr. Mark Warschauer’s laboratory in the School of Education at UCI.  Her research focuses primarily on virtual inclusion, via interactive technologies, of students who are homebound due to medical conditions. She is currently engaged in a national research project on the use of telepresence robots to virtually include these students in their local schools. This study is aimed at examining the social and academic benefits of virtual inclusion, uncovering best practices in deployment of virtual inclusion programs in schools, and evaluating the technology design features that matter in educational settings. Newhart has also conducted research on disparities in quality of dental care for Head Start families and, prior to arriving at UCI, served as the director of oral health programs for the state of Montana.

What this Fellowship/Award Means:

The Public Impact Fellowship is a great honor that reinforces my commitment to conducting research that gives voice to the experiences of underserved populations.  It also increases my determination to share my academic research with the general public to empower families, communities, and school districts to make informed choices on the use of technology in their schools. This motivating award will not only help support the rest of my doctoral journey, but will also serve as a constant reminder that advances in health care can also fuel positive changes in the social and educational experiences of pediatric patients.

Sumner Norman

Sumner Norman

Public Impact Distinguished Fellow

Degrees:

  • Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, UC Irvine, PhD, 2017 expected
  • Chemical Engineering, City College of New York, BSe, 2012
  • Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, UC Irvine, MS, 2014

Research

robot-assisted movement recovery after neurological injury

Biography


Sumner Norman is a doctoral candidate in Dr. David J. Reinkensmeyer’s laboratory in the Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering at UCI. His undergraduate research investigated haptic (sense of touch) robotics at the University of Utah and solid state physics at Brigham Young University. His doctoral research is investigating robot-assisted movement recovery after neurological injury such as stroke or spinal cord injury. Using this approach, he aims to improve the quality of life for those with neurological injury in both clinical outcome and activities of daily living. During his time at UC Irvine, Sumner served on the editorial board for the Journal of NeuroEngineering and Rehabilitation, served as a writer and managing editor for the NPR program “The Loh Down on Science”, and presented his research at the Congressional Caucuses on Robotics and Innovation on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C. Sumner has received the NSF Graduate Research Fellowship, ARCS fellowship, and Data Science Initiative Summer Fellowship.

What this Fellowship/Award Means:

Stroke is the number one cause of disability in the word, and costs the U.S. healthcare system over 70 billion dollars per year! In addition to the great honor that it is to receive the Public Impact Fellowship, it gives me the opportunity to represent the great science that can support and improve the lives of Americans living with disability after a stroke. This award not only supports my doctoral research towards solving disability after stroke, but gives a voice to the families of millions of stroke survivors who can’t wait for rehabilitation technology to arrive in the homes of their loved ones.

Nicole Sherman

Nicole Sherman

Public Impact Distinguished Fellow

Degrees:

  • Ph.D. Criminology, Law and Society, (Expected September 2017), University of California, Irvine
  • M.A. Social Ecology, 2016, University of California, Irvine
  • B.S. Criminal Justice, 2012, San Diego State University
  • B.A. Sociology, 2012, San Diego State University

Research

Problem-solving courts and methods of community-oriented corrections; mechanisms that contribute to desistance from crime.

Biography

Nicole Sherman is a doctoral candidate in Criminology, Law and Society. Nicole’s research examines how identities are constructed and utilized during people’s interactions with the criminal justice system. Her research examines how pro-social labeling and reaffirmation of positive identities, when coupled with other socio-legal constructs such as legitimacy and therapeutic jurisprudence, may facilitate desistance from a criminogenic lifestyle. Nicole’s research explores how Veterans Treatment Courts (VTCs) generally function and what specific correlates appear to be associated with criminal desistance. VTCs are designed to treat military veterans afflicted with trauma-related disorders and substance abuse; rehabilitation, rather than punishment, lies at this nexus. This project attempts to bridge criminological theory of desistance and socio-legal studies of court processes to identify the influential mechanisms that may lead to successful outcomes for offenders who complete the VTC program. She has also worked on a multi-city, multi-method project on the underground gun market in Los Angeles, focusing on offender perceptions of gun laws, community safety, and firearm acquisition. She has publications in Criminal Justice and Behavior, Race and Justice, and Injury Prevention.

What this Fellowship/Award Means:

I am truly humbled to have received this fellowship. This fellowship highlights the importance of justice for marginalized populations. I am honored to be able to conduct research to enrich the lives of military veterans and other disadvantaged populations that have come into contact with the criminal justice system. Receiving this award not only demonstrates how we can achieve better rehabilitative strategies in corrections, but also motivates me to continue researching and evaluating alternative methods to incarceration.

Daniel E. Winkler

Daniel E. Winkler

Public Impact Distinguished Fellow

Degrees:

  • Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, UC Irvine, PhD, 2018 expected
  • Environmental Systems, UC Merced, MS, 2013
  • Biological Anthropology, New York University, BA, 2008

Research

Evolutionary and environmental mechanisms promoting invasive species success in U.S. National Parks and protected areas

Biography

Daniel Winkler is a doctoral candidate in Dr. Travis Huxman’s laboratory in the Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology at UCI. He completed a BA in Biological Anthropology at New York University before interning and working for various government agencies including the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service and the Bureau of Land Management. Daniel also worked for the National Park Service’s Sonoran Desert Network as a Biological Science Technician before returning to school to begin his graduate career. He completed a MS in Environmental Systems at UC Merced studying the impacts of climate change on alpine plants. Since coming to UCI, Daniel has conducted research throughout the Western U.S., Baja California, Mexico, northern Japan, and as a National Park Service Young Leader in Climate Change Fellow at Saguaro National Park in Arizona. Daniel’s current research focuses on the evolutionary mechanisms promoting invasive species success throughout the Southwestern U.S. as well as climate change impacts on native species in the Sonoran Desert.

What this Fellowship/Award Means:

This Public Impact Fellowship will further ensure my academic success and allow me to continue engaging the public in not only my research foci but also the overall power of understanding the world through a scientific lens. Pursuing research interests that are of both high intellectual merit and direct application to solving key environmental issues will continue to be my focus as a Public Impact Fellow at UCI.

Nitin Agarwal

Nitin Agarwal

Public Impact Fellow

Degrees:

  • Computer Science, UC Irvine, PhD, 2019 expected
  • Bioengineering, University of Washington-Seattle, MS, 2013
  • Electrical Engineering, BITS Pilani Rajasthan India, BE, 2010

Research

Understanding the brain connectomics.

Biography

Nitin Agarwal is a doctoral student in Dr. Meenakshisundaram’s iGraviLab in the Department of Computer Science at UCI. After completing his Bachelors in Electrical Engineering from India, he worked on making electroencephalogram (EEG) machines cheaper and more portable at the Indian Institute of Technology (IIT), New Delhi. It was this project that made him realize his ambition to acquire knowledge and skills that he could then apply towards the improvement of society. He then went on to get his Masters in Bioengineering from the University of Washington Seattle, where he researched the use of 3D medical imaging technology to detect lung cancer at early stages. Nitin is currently working on trying to understand how the human brain works. His research revolves around coming up with newer algorithms and visualization tools to study the brain connectomics, which can answer many unsolved questions about various brain disorders. He has presented his work at numerous international conferences and has received recognition within the UCI community, including the receipt of the judges’ award at the 2016 AGS symposium and the Dean’s fellowship.

What this Fellowship/Award Means:

The Public Impact fellowship is a validation of my research and a way to publicize the importance of my work. Most importantly, this fellowship serves as an inspiration and encouragement for me to carry on understanding the brain and its disorders for the betterment of the society. I am overjoyed and deeply humbled on receiving this honor.

Marta De Bortoli

Marta De Bortoli

Public Impact Fellow

Degrees:

  • Civil Engineering, UC Irvine, PhD, 2017 expected
  • Civil Engineering, University of Padova, Italy, MS, 2013
  • Civil Engineering, University of Padova, Italy, BS, 2010

Research

Performance Prediction Equations for Design and Assessment of Structures.

Biography

Marta De Bortoli is a PhD Candidate in the Performance-Based Earthquake Engineering lab in the department of Civil Engineering at UC Irvine. After completing a BS in Civil Engineering at the University of Padova in Italy, Marta won the prestigious EAP Scholarship to study in California and moved to UCI, where she developed an interest in Structural Earthquake Engineering. Upon completion of her Master’s degree she was invited to join Professor Farzin Zareian’s lab at UCI, where she has been working on the simplification of the current probabilistic approach for earthquake design. Her doctoral dissertation involves the development of performance equations that directly predict the behavior of structures when subjected to earthquakes. Her work was presented at the National Earthquake Engineering Conference in Alaska in 2014 and at the World Conference in Chile in 2017.

What this Fellowship/Award Means:

I am deeply honored to be a recipient of the Public Impact Fellowship. This award will help support my doctoral research and further motivate me to develop a simpler and safer approach to designing earthquake-resistant buildings in California.

Adam Dunbar

Adam Dunbar

Public Impact Fellow

Degrees:

  • Criminology, Law & Society, UC Irvine, PhD, 2017 expected
  • Psychology (major) and Sociology (major), Stanford, BA, 2010

Research

Evidence gathering and adjudicative processes, and the potential implications for racial disparities in the legal system

Biography

Adam Dunbar is a doctoral candidate working with Dr. Charis Kubrin and Dr. Nicholas Scurich in the Department of Criminology, Law and Society. He researches the intersection of psychology and the law, focusing specifically on racial disparities in the criminal justice system. In particular, he examines how legal fact finders evaluate evidence and the implications for racial injustice. His dissertation considers the cognitive biases associated with using rap lyrics as evidence in criminal trials. Findings from his dissertation have been reported in media outlets like the Pacific Standard and NPR. Adam has also received numerous fellowships including a Criminology, Law and Society Professional Development Fellowship for his research and a UC-Irvine Pedagogical Fellowship for excellence in teaching.

What this Fellowship/Award Means:

I am honored to have been selected to receive the UCI Public Impact Fellowship, in large part because it highlights my commitment to social justice research. This award helps me continue examining emerging forms of racially discriminatory practices as well as identifying possible solutions for reducing racial disparities in our criminal justice system.

M. Kate Gallagher

M. Kate Gallagher

Public Impact Fellow

Degrees:

  • Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, UC Irvine, PhD, 2017 expected
  • Plant Biology and Conservation, Northwestern University, MS, 2011
  • International Relations, Wellesley College, BS, 2006

Research

Effects of experimental shifts in soil moisture and flowering phenology on plant-pollinator interactions 

Biography

Kate Gallagher is a doctoral candidate in Dr. Diane Campbell’s laboratory in the Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology at UCI. After pursuing a B.A. in International Relations (honors) with a minor in Biology from Wellesley College, she earned a M.S. in Plant Biology and Conservation from Northwestern University under the guidance of Dr. Stuart Wagenius. During her time at Northwestern, Kate developed a deep interest in determining how climate change affects species interactions, which prompted her to join the Campbell lab at UCI for her PhD. Kate’s research aims to determine how plant responses to climate change may mediate their interactions with mutualist pollinators and the extent to which shifts in plant-pollinator interactions may impact their reproductive success. Her research has been supported by the Rocky Mountain Biological Laboratory, as well as the National Science Foundation with a Doctoral Dissertation Improvement Grant. She has presented her research at the Scandinavian Association for Pollination Ecology and at the annual meetings of the Ecological Society of America, where she has held leadership positions as co-chair of the Student Section and representative to the Public Affairs Committee. She has also been recognized for her teaching with the Steinhaus Teaching Award and as a UCI Pedagogical Fellow.

What this Fellowship/Award Means:

I am thrilled and honored to receive the Public Impact Fellowship. Understanding the mechanisms behind observed declines in pollinators and insect-pollinated plants is a critical scientific and societal challenge. Receiving this award motivates me to share my work even more broadly, and in doing so, provide valuable knowledge to land managers and policy makers, and hopefully inspire people to help preserve biodiversity in their communities and around the world.

Shiwei (Steve) Liu

Shiwei (Steve) Liu

Public Impact Fellow

Degrees:

  • Pharmacology & Toxicology, UC Irvine, PhD, 2018 expected
  • Biology, Johns Hopkins University, BA, 2011

Research

Importance of Kappa Opioid Receptors in Chronic Pain

Biography

Shiwei (Steve) Liu is a doctoral candidate in Dr. Catherine Cahill’s laboratory in the joint departments of Anesthesiology and Pharmacology at UCI. Upon finishing his three years of undergraduate studies at Johns Hopkins, he worked at the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, MD as a post-baccalaureate researcher for two years where he published several manuscripts in moderate to high-impact journals and developed an interest in translational medicine research. He currently studies the effects of the kappa opioid receptor system on chronic pain perception to identify non-addictive pain therapeutics that could vastly improve patient quality of life. His research has received recognition through multiple travel awards, such as from the UCI School of Medicine, the Associated Graduate Students (AGS) of UCI Grad Division, and the American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics (ASPET), which have allowed him to present at various major science conferences.

What this Fellowship/Award Means:

I greatly appreciate being awarded the Public Impact Fellowship, which has recognized my enthusiasm and dedication to improving our knowledge of chronic pain treatments. For the rest of my doctoral studies, the award will remind me that my research can truly transform society through rescuing the 1.5 billion patients who currently suffer from chronic pain worldwide. And with this driving support, I am motivated to continue expanding the frontier of this research field even further.

Natalie Pifer

Natalie Pifer

Public Impact Fellow

Degrees:

  • Criminology, Law and Society, UC Irvine, PhD, 2017 expected
  • Social Ecology, UC Irvine, MA, 2014
  • Loyola Law School, J.D., 2011
  • Journalism and Politics, New York University, B.A., 2008

Research

Managing the Mentally Ill in Los Angeles

Biography

Natalie is a current doctoral candidate in the Department of Criminology, Law and Society and will join the faculty at the University of Rhode Island as an Assistant Professor of Criminology and Criminal Justice in Fall 2017. Natalie’s research focuses on understanding how legal categories drive—or frustrate—changes in policing, punishing, and incarcerating vulnerable groups such as juveniles and the mentally ill or disabled. Her dissertation analyzes the LAPD’s Mental Evaluation Unit and LA County’s decision to replace Men’s Central Jail with a jail facility primarily focused on mental health treatment as windows into the criminal justice system’s management of the mentally ill. By examining the development and deployment of these reforms, she is able to trace how the system has evolved in the wake of “transinstitutionalization” and in response to external forces demanding reform. Natalie’s research has been supported by the Haynes Foundation, the UC Irvine Graduate Division Dean, and the Peterson/Microsemi Fellowship. She has published in various outlets and, in 2017, she will deliver an invited lecture on penal policy at the UC Center Sacramento as part of its Emerging Scholars Series.

What this Fellowship/Award Means:

This award highlights the importance of engaging in translational social science research that is accessible and useful to the community. My research seeks to understand—and to ultimately improve—how the criminal justice system treats vulnerable groups and I am honored that my work has been recognized as having the potential for this positive impact.

Kathryn Ringland

Kathryn Ringland

Public Impact Fellow

Degrees:

  • Informatics, UC Irvine, PhD, 2018 expected
  • Psychology, Washington State University Vancouver, BS, 2013

Research

Investigating Virtual Worlds as a Means of Supporting Social Play in Children with Disabilities

Biography

Kathryn E. Ringland is an Informatics PhD Candidate in the School of Information and Computer Sciences, under the advisement of Dr. Gillian Hayes. She received her B.S. in Psychology from Washington State University Vancouver. Her research interests include studying and designing assistive technology for youth with disabilities. Her dissertation work is exploring how an online Minecraft community for children with autism uses social media to support socialization. She is interested how social media expands our definitions of sociality and the assistive role technology plays in our online and offline interactions. She is recognized as an ARCS Scholar.

What this Fellowship/Award Means:

The Public Impact Fellowship is a wonderful honor. I am deeply motivated through helping others in my community and hope that my research will serve to support programs for those who need it most. This award serves to support that goal and helps me to complete my doctoral research.

Sara Sameni

Sara Sameni

Public Impact Fellow

Degrees:

  • Biomedical Engineering, UC Irvine, PhD, 2017 expected
  • Biomedical Engineering, UC Irvine, MS, 2012
  • Biomedical Engineering, UC Irvine, BS, 2009

Research

Developing biomarkers using advanced optical technology to study brain diseases

Biography

Sara Sameni is a Biomedical Engineering PhD student and NSF BEST IGERT fellow working in Dr. Michelle Digman Laboratory and Lab of fluorescence dynamics (LFD). Her current research project is focused on investigating cellular mechanism disturbed in neuronal diseases by exploiting advanced imaging approach called fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM).Using a label free technique, she is developing biomarkers to be used for early detection of brain diseases, and as a powerful tools for drug development. Beside research, Sara holds various leadership positions including co-chair of ICS/Engineering DECADE student council, graduate interconnect peer mentor, and GRC advisory board member. By collaborating with the office of access and inclusions, organizing various skilled development and social events, she hopes to empower women and minorities on STEM field, and increase the diversity on campus.

What this Fellowship/Award Means:

This is a prestigious award that supports me during my PhD journey towards unveiling brain diseases. But more importantly, this reinforces me to share my passion in science with the community. It will also help me to motivate young women and minorities to pursue STEM field.

Yanjun Sun

Yanjun Sun

Public Impact Fellow

Degrees:

  • Anatomy & Neurobiology, UC Irvine, PhD, 2017 expected
  • Biotechnology, UC Irvine, MS, 2012
  • Biotechnology, Northeast Forestry University, China, BS, 2010

Research

Understanding neuronal circuit organization and function in the cerebral cortex in order to assess and treat circuits in the brain that are altered following disease or injury. 

Biography

Yanjun Sun is a doctoral candidate in Dr. Xiangmin Xu’s laboratory in the Department of Anatomy & Neurobiology at UCI. He earned a B.S. in biotechnology at Northeast Forestry University, China, where he conducted diabetes research and was awarded the prestigious Chinese National Scholarship. After receiving an M.S. in biotechnology from UCI, Yanjun continued his studies in neuroscience. Supported by NIH grants and private foundation funds, his research focuses on understanding cell-type specific cortical circuit organization and function by using combined approaches of electrophysiology, optical stimulation and imaging, molecular genetics and viral tracing. One of his projects is investigating the molecular mechanism of visual cortical plasticity during the developmental “critical period”. His research will help to develop novel therapeutic treatments to correct childhood visual disorders and other neurodevelopment disorders. Yanjun has mentored over 20 undergraduate/high school researchers from UCI and outside UCI in his lab. He was a teaching assistant for multiple courses in biological sciences, and has been recognized for his teaching ability as a HHMI-UCI teaching fellow.

What this Fellowship/Award Means:

The Public Impact Fellowship is a great honor that recognized the public significance of my academic research. This is motivating and encouraging for me to continue pursuing biomedical researches and solving the issues of mental health. Receiving this award also made me realize the responsibility of being a scientist is not only about doing research, but more importantly, about educating people in our community with scientific thinking and insights.

Ellen Wann

Ellen Wann

Public Impact Fellow

Degrees:

  • Neurobiology and Behavior, UC Irvine, PhD, 2017 expected
  • Psychology and Neuroscience, St. Olaf College, BA, 2009

Research

Characterizing spatial and temporal dynamics of neuronal activity after ischemic stroke and protection from stroke damage

Biography

Ellen Wann is a doctoral candidate in Dr. Ron Frostig’s laboratory in the Department of Neurobiology and Behavior at UC Irvine. Ellen currently studies how neuronal activity changes after blood flow blockages in the brain and its potential for predicting impending stroke damage. Ellen is a UC Irvine Institute for Clinical and Translational Science TL-1 trainee and has previously received research support as a US Department of Education-UC Irvine Neurobiology and Behavior GAANN fellow. While at UC Irvine, she has also held leadership roles as a department student representative, AAAS Emerging Leaders in Science and Society program liaison and in the Associated Graduate Student government.

What this Fellowship/Award Means:

The Public Impact Fellowship is a tremendous honor and will be critical for me to achieve my career goals. It provides a useful opportunity to advocate for science to stakeholders and convey my research to the public. I look forward to communicating my exciting research and expressing why basic research is invaluable.

View Fellows Archive

Public Impact Fellows